Statements

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Ms. Stéphanie Winet, Head of Stakeholder Engagement, International Organisation of Employers delivers remarks at the opening and closing sessions.

GFMD Business Mechanism national workshop in Qatar, Doha

1 October 2019
  • Competitive and profitable companies require the ability to recruit skills and talent from the largest possible pool and to move personnel around the world. Increasingly, business models require the movement of personnel, as well as goods and information across borders.
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Mr. Roberto Suarez Santos, Secretary-General, International Organisation of Employers (IOE) delivered introductory remarks

GFMD Business Mechanism Regional Workshop for North Africa, Tunis

2 July 2019
  • La migration estun thème autant politique qu’économique: des politiques migratoires restrictives empêchent la mobilité des talents et des compétences, et donc freinent la croissance des entreprises et des économies.Lesentreprises et associations patronales sont les mieux placées pour partager des arguments économiques, essentiels pour contre-carrerdes arguments politiquesparfois trop sécuritaires.La voix du secteur privée estdès lorsprimordiale.
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Ms. Ronnie Goldberg, Senior Counsel, United States Council for International Business (USCIB)

Consultation of the United Nations Network on Migration with Civil Society and other stakeholders, Geneva

4 April 2019
  • At national/regional level, the broad and global network of the IOE can be used to ensure that Employers are at the table when programs are set up. Ex: Engaging with employers in Sri Lanka in identifying local skills needs may be useful to develop programs that can respond to their needs in the booming construction industry. Engaging with employers in both sending and receiving countries to forge partnershipsthat tailor both training and skills needs. Engaging the tech industry in the Silicon Valley or even in the booming tech centers in Ghana may support efforts on leveraging technology.
©Pierre Albouy
Mr. Roberto Suarez Santos, Secretary-General, International Organisation of Employers

United Nations General Assembly High-level Debate on International Migration and Development, New York

27 February 2019
  • Vocational and technical training programs are often outdated and not up to the growing and urgent expectations of a constantly changing skills needs. The legal framework to attract and build talent are also often difficult to implement, very often too local and most importantly not up to the drastic/revolutionary change on the skills needs
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Mr. Erol Kiresepi, President of the International Organisation of Employers, delivers a statement at the opening of the GCM adoption conference​

Global Compact for safe, orderly and regular Migration (GCM) adoption Conference, Marrakech, Morocco

10 DECEMBER 2018​
  • The private sector has a three-pronged stake in well-regulated migration frameworks: to fill skills shortages; ensure social stability; and contribute to the protection of the most vulnerable migrant workers. Letme turn to the economic aspect of this highly political issue.
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Ms Lynn Shotwell, Vice-Chair of the Business Mechanism, delivers a report on the Business meeting of the 2018 GFMD Summit​

11TH GFMD SUMMIT, Marrakech, Morocco​

7 DECEMBER 2018​
  • We examined data highlighting the global competition for talent. In some countries, more people are retiring than entering the labor market. In others, talented individuals leave for better opportunities. Everywhere, there is a digital skills gap and we all must do more to ensure that all people are provided with the education, training and soft skills needed for the jobs of today -and the jobs of tomorrow.
©Pierre Albouy
Mr. Roberto Suarez-Santos, Secretary-General of the International Organisation of Employers, makes a statement at the opening of the 2018 GFMD Summit ​

11TH GFMD SUMMIT, Marrakech, Morocco​

5 DECEMBER 2018
  • More than ever, sustainable companies require the ability to recruit those skills and talent from the largest possible pool and to be able to promote global mobility within its human resources. Evidence has clearly proved thattheir success is tied to the success of the economies in which they live and work. Themaingoal of the Business Mechanism iscoherent with that of the GFMD –migration policies supportingsustainable enterprises and therefore, job creation and economic prosperity.
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Statement delivered by Ronnie Goldberg, on behalf of the International Organisation of Employers and the GFMD Business Mechanism

Global Compact for safe, orderly and regular Migration (GCM) final draft presentation, New York​

13 JULY 2018
  • Regular migration is critical to the success of our enterprises -as well as our economies. That success requires a comprehensive and balanced approach -such as that sought in the GCM -that facilitates the economic contributions of migrants while protecting them from predatory practices.
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Talking Points for Jacqueline Mugo, Executive Director of the Federation of Kenya Employers, Secretary General of Business Africa, Member of the Management Board of the IOE

Session VI: Development and implementation of Bilateral and Multilateral Labour Mobility and Social Security Arrangements, Nairobi

11 July 2018
  • The absence of sound low-skill mechanisms has serious consequences. Functioning legal avenues for low-skilled migration tends to reduce the incidence of trafficking, irregular migration, informal employment activities, unethical recruitment practices and forced labour. The latter of course is the target of the IRIS system which IOM is developing with the support of the international business community.
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Head of Stakeholder Engagement – GFMD Business Mechanism, Stéphanie Winet delivers remarks at Responsible Business Forum on Sustainable Development.

Responsible Business Forum on Sustainable Development, Johannesburg

27 JUNE 2018
  • As we all know, developed economies are facing the labour impact of aging populations and falling birth rates. The shrinking domestic labour pool means that receiving countries must look abroad to fill worker shortages at all skill levels. By 2020, there is expected to be a worldwide shortage of 38 to 40 million skilled workers.2On the side of the sending countries, theyrely on remittances from their citizens working abroad and on circular migration for the skills and experience brought by returning citizens.
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Ellen Yost of FRAGOMEN delivers remarks about “Shaping international labour migration policy to ensure business access to diverse talent” at IOE Forum

IOE Forum during the International Labour Conference, Geneva

6 JUNE 2018
  • Migration has become an enormously contentious and hot button issue in many parts of the world.The debate over migration often confuses several issues: refugees, issues attached to economic migrants,andthe difficulty of moving skilled workers. Soit's important to be precise. As business and the IOE, we are concerned with labor migration.
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Stéphanie Winet, Head of stakeholder engagement – GFMD Business Mechanism gives her remarks about the GFMD workshop

GFMD workshop, Rabat

18 APRIL 2018
  • We suggested a number of practical solutions, including trusted employerprograms to facilitate processing for organizations with a record of compliance, and work authorization mobility to allow foreign workers to change employers with fewer formalities. These programs conserve resources for government and business and protectmigrants.
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Peter Robinson, President and CEO of USCIB and IOE Regional Vice-President for North America, makes a statement at the International Dialogue on Migration.

International Dialogue on Migration (IDM), New York

26 MARCH 2018
  • These benefits devolve to both receiving countries and sending countries. Developed economies are facing the labour impact of aging populations and falling birth rates. The shrinking domestic labour pool means that receiving countries must look abroad to fill worker shortages at all skill levels. By 2020, there is expected to be a worldwide shortage of 38 to 40 million skilled workers.3 Sending countries rely on remittances from their citizens working abroad and on circular migration for the skills and experience brought by returning citizens.
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Ronnie Goldberg, Senior Counsel, United States Council for International Business (USCIB) gives her statement about the Coordination meeting on international migration.

UN DESA Coordination meeting on international migration, New York

15 February 2018
  • While the global business community has long advocated for policies that facilitate labour migration, we realize that migration is a complement to the native workforce. Around the world, businesses are working with governments to invest in education and training, bring women, youth, and underrepresented groups into the labour market, and develop policies that reflect the 21stcentury economy.
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Karl Cox’s statement about the GMC Stocktaking Meeting

GCM Stocktaking Meeting, Puerto Vallarta

4 December 2017
  • With proper governance and enlightened leadership, migration can be an opportunity for all: businesses, destination countries, origin countries (particularly with appropriate circular migration policies which facilitate the return of skills to the originating economy) and, of course, migrants themselves.
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Head of stakeholder engagement, Stephanie Winet, gives remarks at the multi-stakholder hearing on the Global Compact on Migration.

GCM MULTISTAKEHOLDER HEARING, NEW YORK

24-25 JULY 2017
  • In countries of origin, the desire for a better life through enhanced economic opportunity continues to be a strong incentive. The current reality demonstrates the gross disparities in economic opportunities and the inconsistency of promoting trade but not correlative mobility of human capital. This dysfunction operates across the skill spectrum but is less prevalent at the high skills level.
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Ridhika Batra, Country Director for the Federation of Indian chambers of Commerce and Industry in the USA, makes a statement at the UN hearings in New York.

GCM MULTISTAKEHOLDER HEARING, NEW YORK

24-25 JULY 2017
  • With regards to discussions onthe contributions of migrants and diasporas to all dimensions of sustainable development,I must draw attention to the case of the Indian Diaspora, which in addition to being one of the largest, is also one of the most successful in the world. In 2016, India was the top recipient of remittances at $ 62.7 billion, despite a significant 8.9%dropcompared to the figures from 2015.
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Mirela Stoia, Director of Immigration Services at PricewaterhouseCoopers, gives remarks at the IOM’s International Dialogue on Migration.

IDM WORKSHOP, GENEVA

18-19 JULY 2017
  • Engagement with government bodies and policy makers through responding to consultations and requests for contribution to policy making to ensure that immigration rules and regulations (both existing and proposed) will not be discriminatory to migrants and afford the same employment rights (as far as practicable) to migrants as those applicable to resident workers.
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Ms. Linda Kromjong, Secretary-General of the International Organisation of Employers, makes a statement at the opening of the 2017 GFMD Business Mechanism Meeting.

GFMD BUSINESS MEETING, BERLIN

29 JUNE 2017
  • The challenge for governments is to negotiate an international document based on facts and evidence, not on misperceptions. The private sector can therefore be a valuable partner to ensure that migration is an engine for increased economic efficiency and national competitiveness. Interventions to build and deploy skills that are executed without private sector buy-in and involvement risk poor outcomes.
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Chair of the GFMD Business Advisory Group, Mr. Austin Fragomen, delivers remarks at the 2017 GFMD Business Meeting.

10TH GFMD SUMMIT, BERLIN

28-30 JUNE 2017
  • Migration policies must be flexible enough to accommodate both longstanding and evolving business models and workplace structures. A range of migration options must be available to facilitate mobility in all skill levels, including dedicated programs for short-term assignments, as well as client-site placements and other forms of remote work. Policies must also be flexible enough to adapt to changing skills needs, and specifically to accommodate the need for lower-skilled workers.
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Head of stakeholder engagement, Stephanie Winet, gives remarks at the 3rd UN Thematic Session on the Global Compact on Migration.

GCM THEMATIC SESSION, GENEVA

20 JUNE 2017
  • Employers can be a valuable partner in identifying skills needs and establishing frameworks for certifying foreign qualifications. Cooperation with the private sector can ensure that migrant workers and returning migrants can use their skills to their full potential. Business associations can work with their members to coordinate efforts and communicate industry needs to the government.
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Mr. Austin Fragomen, Chairman, GFMD Business Advisory Group, delivers a statement at the 2017 International Dialogue on Migration.

INTERNATIONAL DIALOGUE ON MIGRATION (IDM), NEW YORK

19 April 2017
  • Low skilled migration must be addressed as a source of employees, particularly for medium and small employers. Employers frequently are unable to recruit workers from the domestic labor force. Legal pathways must be established for low skilled migrants to provide services in short supply, lawfully.
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Ms. Linda Kromjong, Secretary-General of the International Organisation of Employers (IOE), delivers the Report of the GFMD Business Mechanism at the opening ceremony in Dhaka.

NINTH GFMD SUMMIT, DHAKA

10-12 DECEMBER 2016
  • During its first year, the Business Mechanism has operated as a start-up: identifying the role of business immigration policy and while thinking toward the future, adequatesolutions, organizing a business constituency ready to engage on migration-related issues, shaping a business agenda, building a lasting institutional framework, creating awareness among the business world and looking for funding to ensure the sustainability of the pilot.
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Ms. Lynn Shotwell, Executive Director of the Council for Global Immigration delivers remarks at the New York dialogue.

A DIALOGUE ON GLOBAL MIGRATION COMPACT, NEW YORK

14 NOVEMBER 2016
  • Employers encounter the widest variety of migrants through the local hire process. The applicants who present themselves may have migrated through family or as refugees or through another employer or as a student. They may have work authorization or may require sponsorship by the employer. Depending on local laws, such sponsorship may or may not be a possibility.
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Ms. Stephanie Winet, GFMD Head of Stakeholder Engagement of the GFMD Business Mechanism delivers a statement.

International Dialogue on migration (IDM), Geneva

12 October 2016
  • When it comes to migration, the IOE and its members regard migration as a necessary and positive phenomenon. Inclusive growth and sustainable development require open markets, competitiveness, and innovation – and all of these imply robust and coherent policies to facilitate the movement of people.
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Ms. Ronnie Goldberg, Chair of the GFMD Business Advisory Group, delivers a statement at the UN Summit.

UNITED NATIONS SUMMIT FOR REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS, NEW YORK

19 September 2016
  • Employers regard migration as a necessary and positive phenomenon. Inclusive growth and sustainable development require open markets, competitiveness, and innovation – and all of these imply robust and coherent policies to facilitate the movement of people. Migration is a vehicle for fulfilling personal aspirations, for balancing labour supply and demand, for sparking innovation, and for transferring and spreading skills.